Charles Powell

email: cpowell@cwp.io

GitHub

Papers


WGN, the Journal of the IMO 45:2 (April 2017)

Modelling and Analysis of Diurnal Variation in Meteor Flux

Charles Powell



Abstract

Temporal and spatial variations of peak hour and idealised sine function fit are considered in reflection of an extended model of the diurnal shift mechanism. This model is formed by extension of the currently understood mechanism, providing a mathematical argument focusing on orbital velocity. Hourly detection counts collected by forward-scatter radio detection are used as data to analyse the form of diurnal shift for each observer. The fit and mean peak hour of the diurnal shift and are considered across nearly 350 observers, analysing variation from 2000 to 2016, as well as variation between data from 9 latitude and 14 longitude categories spanning at most 10 degrees each, to determine the agreement of data with the model. Modelling the orbital velocity of Earth as a primary factor behind diurnal variation is supported by the timezone corrected peak hours and correlation with longitude. The mechanism does not appear to vary with time, however the relative intensity of diurnal variation with respect to background detection counts is damped as a maximum in these hourly detection counts is observed. This provides a mathematical model of the diurnal shift mechanism, accompanied with support from a large dataset.

Citation Details

C. Powell
WGN, Volume 45, No. 2, April 2017, pp. 32 - 37
Journal received March 22, 2017
NASA ADS bibcode 2017JIMO...45...32P

WGN, the Journal of the IMO 45:4 (August 2017)

Temporal and Spatial Variation of Meteor Flux in Radio Data

Charles Powell, Kristina Veljkovic



Abstract

The variation of hourly detection counts from almost 350 radio meteor detection stations is analysed to determine the effect of year, time of day, and latitude on observations, as well as discussions of annual and monthly variations. Results indicate a significant increase in hourly detection counts in 2009-2010, supporting previous hypotheses of correlation between radio meteor detection rates and solar activity. Annual increases in meteor rates during summer months are noted, with no clear explanation. Monthly variations are not significant. The effect of latitude on detection counts is significant for years 2005-2016. For 12 of 17 considered years, night-time detection counts are greater than day-time counts, likely due to changes in ionospheric structure at night.

Citation Details

C. Powell, K. Veljkovic
WGN, Volume 45, No. 4, August 2017, pp. 73 - 81
Journal received September 6, 2017
NASA ADS bibcode 2017JIMO...45...73P